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   The past few months have been what I can best describe as a roller coaster ride in my life. A few highs and some rather significant and painful lows. Some rides in a life can be like that. While I haven’t been posting much on here in a while; most of my time has been spent working, fishing and trying to untangle the knots that have formed in the different lines of my life. Things can often get like that on the days that end in Y. With water temperatures moving to a level that will shut down much of my cold-water fishing for a time; I’ll be spending most of my free time working on two book manuscripts and hoping to live long enough to get them to the finish line. There is so much involved with conducting “research”, writing, photo shoots and post processing images to make a work that is accurate, insightful, enjoyable, visually appealing and complete. Readers deserve that experience. Both books will really be what I can best characterize as “life works” because both books will be a reflection and summary of my long-term love affair with moving waters, fly fishing and crafting flies worthy of the beautiful wild trout I pursue. There have been many years spent waiving a stick over the water and wrapping feathers around little hooks, with many stories to tell. It’s hard to maintain a social media presence and give these projects the effort they deserve, and it’s best at times to be quiet, focus and continue to pick away at the knots. Stay tuned for more in the future. Till then …. www.ramsayflies.com #tieoneon #itsaboutthefish


No hatch in our eastern waters creates more longing for me than Ephemerella subvaria, better known as the Hendrickson. Like springtime, the Hendrickson hatch seems like a renewal of life and the launch the fishing year. While I've fished quite a bit in every month so far this year, it's such an annual celebration when these big pink mayflies begin to emerge. This weeks post is my Hendrickson Flymph which did quire well this past weekend. The pattern is wood duck flank fibers for the tail, mixed red fox belly and pink rabbit dubbing touch dubbed on Pearsall's #35 Salmonberry silk and sparsely hackled with Gambel's Quail. Coot or Chukar Partridge work equally well. Tie a few, and tie one on ....



The process of designing an imitative fly pattern to represent an insect found in nature is an evolution. It starts out with a thought about simple things like color, size, shape, footprint on the water (if it's a dry pattern), and other visual characteristics. Good fly designs often take time, patience, stream research and revision to tune up a pattern that consistently gets things done. The past 4 or 5 years has been spent tying, testing and tuning a series of patterns to imitate our early stoneflies which has been a fun process. I'm getting this really close and maybe I'll roll that out one day. Who knows? The biggest influence on my tying journey has been Vince Marinaro's "In The Ring of the Rise" (Crown 1976). Chapter 5 of his book is called "A Game of Nods" in which Vince describes this process of designing a truly effective fly. A trout that rises to a fly but rejects it on closer inspection says that something is mostly right, but you still have work to do. It's one of the most interesting books in my collection, and the book that set me on a path years ago. The "research" continues. Till next time ....




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