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I'm not at all ashamed to admit that I don't enjoy fishing in the winter much. It's not to say that it doesn't happen, but it doesn't happen often. There are usually too many flies to be tied, holiday mayhem to prepare for and other demands that occupy my time. Sometimes the distance of spring and warmer weather is just too far away to bear. Pictured this week is a shot from a little Pocono brook trout stream I hiked into over the weekend. Till next time ...... www.ramsayflies.com


I’ve always had a soft spot for older fly reels. Beyond their obvious utilitarian purpose, they bring a lot more to the dance than that alone. There’s obvious craftsmanship in their machining, a well thought out use of materials and a fine sense of aesthetics. Most of them have taken on a beautiful patina over the course of time and use. Some of them carry the mark of their maker stamped on their inner surfaces as a symbol of pride in their skill as machinists and artisans. In the end they are the perfect complement to a nice cane rod, bringing balance and beauty to the pairing of equipment and an enjoyable day on the water. And yes, they sing a beautiful song when a strong fish runs against the drag. This week’s pic is a new addition to the herd; one I’ve had on my wish list for many years, a 3” Hardy St. George. This one was made in the 1930’s and is stamped on the inside “T.A.G.”, the makers mark of Thomas Armstrong who began working for Hardy Brothers in 1928. I’m looking forward to mounting this one on one of my favorite cane rods next spring when the Hendricksons begin to appear over the water. Till then ……. www.ramsayflies.com




My journey as a fly tyer has run both long and wide and has encompassed a deep dive into a variety of traditional and contemporary styles and patterns. My normal tying is focused on the subtle intricacies of designing and tying imitative trout flies for those tough, selective fish and tying orders for my customers. There are periods in the year that I often take an abrupt departure from my normal fly tying. Lately my attention has been on the traditional Yorkshire Spiders of Pritt, Edmonds, Lee, Stewart and others. While I am fascinated by their simplicity; their sleek lines and the way they play in the water, I’m even more intrigued by the creativity and thought behind them. I sometimes imagine what it must have like to be a fly tyer in the 1800’s and having a collection of tying materials limited to those you could collect from local hunters, trappers and farmyards, and using these materials to craft imitations of the insects found in your local stream. Imagine tying them without the benefit of a vise, a bobbin or other modern tools. When you look at these flies thru that lens you can begin to truly appreciate them. This week’s pic is TE Pritt’s No. 11 pattern, the March Brown with some of the materials specified in its recipe. In a few weeks I will be offering a collection of these flies I’ve tied in a handmade leather fly wallet. Till then …… www.ramsayflies.com